Beiträge

English Spoken Here…Learning to Ski in Schliersee

Located directly on the slope at Stumflingenbahn, with it’s very American party atmosphere, Martina Loch’s “Snowcamp” motivates people of all ages to share in her passion for Winter Sport. Her shop has the feeling of walking into a California surf shop with every surface, even the ceiling chock full of memorabilia. You could spend an hour just taking in all the great energy.

I recently discovered the daughter of my landlord is one of Martina’s very stable of 50 professional ski instructors and not only that, she also is a fluent english speaker. She would be the perfect person to help me introduce my readers to what it’s like to take ski lessons here at Spitzingsee skigebiete. It is incredible that in this picturesque ski area, learning to ski in english is absolutely possible.

Victoria Schoeller, my landlords daughter, is the absolute definition of a Bavarian alpine woman, a fantastic combination of strength and beauty. She kindly spent a day with me between her private students lessons and gave me the skinny on how Martina’s lessons work. I found her tips incredibly helpful in improving my knowledge and skills for downhill skiing. From tips on proper adjustment of my gear, to a better stance for greater enjoyment while tearing down the mountain. Having an expert guide you is an absolute treat no matter your skill level.

Martina’s Snowcamp at Spitzingsee has been in business for 32 years and is the heart of the Spitzingsee ski area. With Martina’s vast knowledge of ski and snow sport she has gathered an amazing array of snow sport talent. Their knowledge of the mountain terrain and how to guide and teach various techniques ensures you a quick entry into making the most of your winter vacation. Either for beginner or for those wishing to improve their skills, you can find just the patient expert you need.

Even though I live here, I was astounded by the incredible extent of what Martina’s shop has to offer in the way of lessons.  Besides group, private and family ski courses, they offer courses for Nordic walking, snow shoe excursions, ski touring, snowboarding, split board the list just seems endless. You can arrive without reservations their brochure says. It is always smartest to get to the slopes early and the shop opens at 8 am so you want to get in there and get your name on a list for a class before 9. I honestly can’t see what is stopping you from dropping in and joining the fun.

 

 

For more information check out their webpage:
http://www.snowcamp-martina-loch.de

 

Also drop by their Instagram and Facebook accounts and show them some love:
https://www.facebook.com/Schneeaktivitäten-Martina-Loch-149857991695193/
https://www.instagram.com/schneeaktivitaeten/?hl=en

 

 

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).

 

 

 

The Lüftlmaler of Schliersee….Peter Wimmer

I have been chasing the tail of the elusive and ever busy Lüftlmaler, for over a year now. With so many historic homes and new buildings, his work load never seems to ease. Thankfully we were able to carve out a few hours to meet.

When you think of the typical picturesque Bavarian or Alpine village you can’t help but think of all the beautifully painted building facades that decorate houses. Having once been an art restorer in my former life myself as well as a decorative painter, I have an endless fascination and respect for this timeless art form.

Peter Wimmer, Schliersee’s most esteemed Lüftmaler is known far and wide for his skills. I had the greatest pleasure to have this short visit with him while he worked on a small project near his home in Schliersee. Bathed in sunlight, he was working high on a scaffolding when I first approached him. His warm and jovial energy is quite infectious and I immediately felt comfortable talking with him.

He explained that there had been some damage to the stucco of the side of this historic home so he was replicating the Florentine detail painting around the windows. This for him was a simple repair. I can only imagine the scale of many of his other structures in his work experiences. Oxblood and ochre were his color palate on the day. These tones brought be right back to my mind t a trip I took to Provence and the village of Roussillon. These ancient colors are of the earth and their influence reached all the way to this lakeside alpine village.

What is a Lüftlmaler you ask? Well, in Peter’s case, he is a Master of the handcrafted method of wall-painting that became popular in alpine villages in the 18 century. Its popularity grew in Italy and Southern Germany during the baroque period as a way of showing wealth. These opulent paintings featuring many times religious figures were painted using the fresco technique.

The Fresco technique is much like it sounds, you have to work on a “fresh” or wet plaster surface. In doing so the paint is absorbed and becomes permanently impregnated into the wall surface. I found an interesting bit of “his-story” that details how the term ‘Lüftlmalerei’ came to be. It states that “Franz Seraph Zwinck (1748-1792), probably the most well-known craftsman of his guild. The story goes that he lived in a house called ‘Zum Lüftl’ in Oberammergau (such house names can still be found there rather often) and because of his profession, was called ‘the Lüftlmaler’ (the ‘Lüftl’ painter). The name of the whole guild most probably developed from this name during the 19th century”.

 

 

I hope you will take the time to look up Peter Wimmer and learn more about his magnificent talent.

www.lueftlmaler.eu

Peter Wimmer
Seestraße 37
83727 Schliersee

Tel.: 08026/94844

E-Mail: mail@wandkunst-wimmer.de

 

 

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).

 

 

 

Schliersee…So Much More Than Cows

After several years of obsessively photographing the various local Almabtriebs, this year I was sent a very kind invitation to come and experience another lovely local farming event. The Schafprämierung, in english we would call it a sheep “Best in Show” which, also included goats. This event is held each year in Tegernsee at Kohlhauf-Hof.

Sadly, after many years of great weather, this year the event received a complete soaking due to the remnants of hurricane Maria. Though the weather dampened everything, animal and people alike, it didn’t dampen the enthusiasm of the farmers and young breeders.

Despite the weather, the atmosphere was a festive one. Of course there was a small local traditional band playing and the air was fragrant with hot homemade stews, sausages and lamb steaks. Never to be forgotten at any German gathering, an entire table of delicious homemade cakes. Local vendors set up booths and sold various hand made products like  cattle bells and sheep’s wool items.  An amazing weaver from Miesbach brought her traditional Bavarian style loom carpets while women carded and spun wool. For the children a class was offered on felting wool and they really enjoyed.

Representing Schliersee was Franz Leitner (junior). His families beautiful farm, Kirchbergerhof is located in the  Fischhausen part of Schliersee. Franz was showing his magnificent Alpine Steinschaff. Through this event I learned In 2009 the Alpines Steinschaf was named “endangered livestock breed of the year” so its cultivation and care are very important to the breeds survival. It was great to be there in support of a fellow Schlierseer.

What stole my heart were the happy faces of the young breeders, Jungzuchter, who were showing their sheep for the first time. Watching the connection of these young children and their much loved and trusting sheep was precious. The joy of the parents and grandparents who could share their passion for animal husbandry was written all over their faces. These traditions of local farming if not taught and shared might one day might sadly die out. Sharing and teaching them to the younger generations helps to keep the traditions alive. Their joy just fills you with pride for this beautiful alpine land and its people.

I am sure there were technical aspects of a Schafprämierung which were very important for the health of these local breeds but for me it was the joy of community that I most took away from the day. The excitement of seeing the results of the years hard work, breeding and caring for these sweet faced creatures. The sheep were definitely the stars and their personalities shined through. Many of the sheep tried nibbling on the serious judges aprons causing them to break from their important stoic roles into warm laughter.

 

 

The judges took great care to check each animal thoroughly for particular signs of good breeding. The health and care given to every animal was judged accordingly to a strict standard.

 

Unfortunately, although I was properly attired for the weather, myself and my camera encased in gore-tex for protection I ended up getting soaked to the skin which sadly brought and end to my visit.

 

 

For more information on Schafprämierung and events:
http://www.alpinetgheep.com/news-bayern.html

To learn how you can stay at the beautiful Kirchbergerhof farm:

http://www.kirchbergerhof.info/frame-index.html

 

 

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).