Beiträge

Time Traveling in Schliersee at the Markus Wasmeier Freilichtmuseum with Irmi Baumann

Raus aus dem Alltag – rein in das Landleben, wie es einst war or Step back in time to experience country life as it use to be. This is the motto of the Markus Wasmeier Freilichtmuseum.

It was with this in mind, Irmi Baumann, museum guide invited myself and some close friends on a private tour in the final days before the season’s closing. Irmi is one of the museums guides who can speak english so for me it was a real treat.

On the day of our tour the village was blanketed in thick Autumn fog making it feel very much that the veil of time was thin and we could easily step through into the Bavarian farming past.   Irmi explained to us that the historic village, which is composed of 12 buildings painstakingly disassembled and then reassembled, was the life long passion of two time olympic gold medalist Markus Wasmeier. He and his family work tirelessly to preserve traditions and customs of this beautiful valley and the local way of life.

Irmi shares this passion and from a very early age, always clung to the stories her grandparents told about life as it use to be. When things were more simple and unplugged. Each fact she shares with the visitor about the structures at the museum are peppered with mystical folklore and farming practicality.

On our tour we met a lovely local craftsman in the dying art of shingle making. He was covered in wood shavings and fragrant with the scent of tree sap as he busied himself at his work. He kindly paused a moment and explained to us about the “Schindel Dach” or Shingle roof. He explained it is traditional that all roofs are covered with 3 layers of shingles made of lark wood.

Each roof will last about 60 years. The long poles and large stones on the roves of typical alpine farmhouses are there to hold down the shingles and in winter when the snow is on the roof, this also serves as insulation.

Inside one of the cosy historic sitting rooms or Stube, we gathered around the Kachelofen or wood fired, tiled oven, which heats the house. On the day of our tour, light was in short supply and it was explained to us how beeswax candles were too expensive for every day use. In the 18 hundreds, the period of these buildings, a Kienspan was used. The Kienspan was a long shiv of resinous pine that would be clamped in a tall holder and lit, this would burn for hours.

There are endless stories to discover and exciting lessons to learn from the past.

For example, why are the thresholds are unusually high? Was it because people back then believed that evil spirits could not pass over them? Where did the four-poster beds come from and why didn’t people sleep lying down in their beds? Why the hearth fires were never allowed to die out?

 

 

You can learn so much and more like this, just give the museum a call and see if you can arrange and english tour for your next visit when the museum opens once more in spring 2019.

 

The Museum
https://www.wasmeier.de

The Guide
https://www.irmibaumann.de

 

 

 

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).

 

 

Alpine Farmers Gathering in Schliersee for 71st Almbauerntag

Last weekend, the farmers of Schliersee and of Oberbayern joined together to celebrate Almbauerntag. This year the council of farmers, who work the high pastures, gathered at one of our local Alms to discuss alpine farming issue both social and political. It was due to this fact that the 71st Almbauerntag for this region was happily celebrated this year here in Schliersee.

Almbauerntag is always celebrated on the second week in October two weeks following the last Almabtrieb, which is normally the 29th of September. I am sure these dates have been established due to the weather, as we seem to get a light snowfall on the peeks during the first week of October.

After a Sunday morning church service at St. Sixtus church in Schliersee, a procession including the local farmers, decorated animals, our local marching band, town council and the various trachten groups. This colorful parade wound around the downtown area and ended up in an autumnal beer tent on the green near Vitalwelt. Locals and visitors alike gathered and lined the streets in colorful trachten, giving our alpine lake town a timeless appearance.

Many of our village farms including Jörgenbauer, Unterriß, Anderlbauer and Kirchbergerhof were in attendance. Franz Leitner of Kirchbergerhof brought along his beautiful black Bergschafe who were led through the bustling streets with only a handful of feed. Bringing up the rear of their group where a pair of tail wagging baby lambs. Hartl Markhauser and his children displayed several historic harvesting equipment. Carriages festooned with ribbons and colorful flower bouquets; impeccably groomed horses with glistening livery were all in attendance as well.

With traditional music filling the air, a small static display on the grass allowed visitors to capture plenty of photos before everyone headed into the cool shade of the tent. A deliciously fragrant lunch was catered with Bavarian efficiency to a packed crowd and refreshing drinks were quickly dispatched. Our fellow contributor Angelika Prem from Hennererhof with the help of local Sennerin served slices of cake from a table awash in delectable deserts.

 

 

To find out more about our local farms and possibly plan your next farm friendly family holiday here are a few links from our farms.

 

http://rixnerhof.de

https://www.hennerer.com

https://www.unterriss-hof.de

https://www.biohof-joergenbauer.de

http://anderlbauer.schliersee.de/unser_hof/unser_hof.php

https://www.kirchbergerhof.info

https://www.schliersee-touristik.de/bauernhof-urlaub/

 

 

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).