Laura Boston-Thek “American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).”

Taste of Italy in Schliersee – La Stazione

No structure in Neuhaus strikes more interest with locals and tourists alike than our local little train station. For four years my husband and I speculated about this building. You have to imagine our excitement when one Saturday while doing our obligatory recycling duty we noticed a sandwich board placed out front. What could this mean? Within a day the buzz began, “have you heard?…Did you see?”. Thankfully my colleague Ulrike McCarthy was already on the trail of the story and invited me along for a visit.

Claudia Huber created a very appropriately named “La Stazione”, located inside the Fischhausen-Neuhaus Train Station. It is truly a feast for both the eyes as well as the stomach. I would describe it as a cross between a deliciously inviting Italian trattoria and a cozy nook in your favorite bookstore. It is incredibly inviting for the travelers by train and for those who just stop in after a long wander through our beautiful alpine landscape.

The details are too numerous to mention but daily Claudia whips up a delectable Italian specialties such as lasagna or a seasonal rigatoni puttanesca. She has a regular menu offering traditional panini sandwiches and focaccia. Bright bowls of Mediterranean lemons and enormous wheels of Parmigiano-Reggiano set the scene. Breakfast is offered with equal delight topped off with freshly squeezed orange juice.

Claudia’s warm and welcoming personality and attention to detail are simply everywhere. From the thoughtful reading glasses on each table to the inviting Swedish stove that will be a draw to any wanderer seeking a snug spot this Winter to enjoy one of the many warm beverages on the menu.

I honestly cannot say enough about the excitement La Stazione has created for local and tourist alike. You simply must experience it for yourself.  I will leave you with this little insider tip. La Stazione offers fresh Wasmeier Museum beer on tap.

 

Arrive by foot, car or train to the La Stazione, Fischhausen-Neuhaus Train Station. For more information: https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Bar/La-Stazione-2227977087230011/

Wednesday thru Sunday 10:00 – 18:30, Monday and Tuesday Closed

 

 

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).

 

 

Fresh Fish in Schliersee

Having grown up on the East Coast of the United States, my husband and I are always in search of places we can buy fresh local fish. After receiving an insider’s tip from a fish-loving girlfriend, we decided to go and investigate.

On a chilly summer Friday afternoon, we walked to the small, nondescript building located near the lake, which holds the Schliersee Fishing Club or Fischereivereins Schliersee. A rustic sign above the door explained the times “Fridays from 16-18 UHR” but by quarter to four a long line of people had gathered early. As with all things in Germany, it was all very orderly.

The dark inside of the building was very much like a Tardis, seemingly much larger than it appeared. I asked if I could observe and take a few photos to share in our local tourist magazine and they very kindly obliged. Two men worked in tandem filling each order. One man, using a net would capture the fish from tanks in the floor, using a boardwalk system. He would then hand the fish over to the other man, who is clad in white plastic apron. This man would deftly dispatch the freshly caught fish with a single thud. With great skill the fish is then quickly cleaned and placed in a box to be sold.

At the counter, a simple table with a scale, each fish was wrapped. Other boxes also held locally caught and smoked fish of varying species. While I was peeking about through my lens I spied my friend and insider, face full of anticipation, picking up her weekly order.

This little local experience is fun for local as well as tourist and the line outside seemed to reflect just that. I do hope you will add this to your list of “things to do in Schliersee”.

 

 

For more information about the Fischereivereins Schliersee:

Head Fisherman Schrädler

https://www.fv-schliersee.de

 

You can find the building along the footpath that goes from Al Lago Italian restaurant through Am Hofhaus am See, and along thee high hedged path towards Vitalwelt and the Kurparc. If you have any trouble just ask someone, you might be surprised that they too are headed to buy fish.

 

 

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).

 

 

 

Alpine Farmers Gathering in Schliersee for 71st Almbauerntag

Last weekend, the farmers of Schliersee and of Oberbayern joined together to celebrate Almbauerntag. This year the council of farmers, who work the high pastures, gathered at one of our local Alms to discuss alpine farming issue both social and political. It was due to this fact that the 71st Almbauerntag for this region was happily celebrated this year here in Schliersee.

Almbauerntag is always celebrated on the second week in October two weeks following the last Almabtrieb, which is normally the 29th of September. I am sure these dates have been established due to the weather, as we seem to get a light snowfall on the peeks during the first week of October.

After a Sunday morning church service at St. Sixtus church in Schliersee, a procession including the local farmers, decorated animals, our local marching band, town council and the various trachten groups. This colorful parade wound around the downtown area and ended up in an autumnal beer tent on the green near Vitalwelt. Locals and visitors alike gathered and lined the streets in colorful trachten, giving our alpine lake town a timeless appearance.

Many of our village farms including Jörgenbauer, Unterriß, Anderlbauer and Kirchbergerhof were in attendance. Franz Leitner of Kirchbergerhof brought along his beautiful black Bergschafe who were led through the bustling streets with only a handful of feed. Bringing up the rear of their group where a pair of tail wagging baby lambs. Hartl Markhauser and his children displayed several historic harvesting equipment. Carriages festooned with ribbons and colorful flower bouquets; impeccably groomed horses with glistening livery were all in attendance as well.

With traditional music filling the air, a small static display on the grass allowed visitors to capture plenty of photos before everyone headed into the cool shade of the tent. A deliciously fragrant lunch was catered with Bavarian efficiency to a packed crowd and refreshing drinks were quickly dispatched. Our fellow contributor Angelika Prem from Hennererhof with the help of local Sennerin served slices of cake from a table awash in delectable deserts.

 

 

To find out more about our local farms and possibly plan your next farm friendly family holiday here are a few links from our farms.

 

http://rixnerhof.de

https://www.hennerer.com

https://www.unterriss-hof.de

https://www.biohof-joergenbauer.de

http://anderlbauer.schliersee.de/unser_hof/unser_hof.php

https://www.kirchbergerhof.info

https://www.schliersee-touristik.de/bauernhof-urlaub/

 

 

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).

 

 

 

 

 

Almkirta in Schliersee, Nearer My God to Thee

On a very hot morning in August, pack heavy with gear and extra water, I set off to experience my first traditional Bavarian Almkirta. I had been invited by one of our local herders. Not one to ever pass up an invitation to point my lens at something new, off I went. Thankfully it wasn’t a long hike or even a steep hike up to Krainsbergeralm, it is even listed in guides as a “Senior walk” or one that is good for all ages.

Up and up I trudged, truly enjoying the dancing waters of a fresh flowing mountain stream that lined my way. I have to admit I was surprised by the volume of traffic headed up this rocky road normally only meant for bikes and wanderers. In one car that passed me was obviously the priest and I hoped my slow pace would not cause me to miss the celebration completely. It was at that moment a car being driven by an elderly couple pulled along side me and asked if I wanted to ride along. With a big smile I exclaimed yes, that I didn’t want to miss the Almkirta and thanked them profusely.

 

Once I was in the car the endless chatter in the distinct local dialect began. Much of it I could follow along and add my two cents but when I could see on their faces that my pronunciation wasn’t quite right I explained that I was an American living here in Schliersee. Their surprise was quite apparent and it was as if they had discovered a unicorn wandering in the woods. Sadly our conversation was cut short as the ride had only to last about 250 meters to the gate of the Alm.

 

You could hear the voices and revelry of the alpine music all the way down the dusty lane which was also intermingled with the tinkling sounds of the bells the cows in the pastures were wearing. I never know how I will be received arriving alone with a giant camera at my side, but thankfully before I knew it a gentleman I had once photographed during a local Almabtrieb came right up and made me feel very welcome.

 

I feel at this point in the story, I should explain just what is an Almkirta. Almkirta is a church service held high in the mountains. Sort of giving a “Nearer My God to Thee” feeling to attending church. Folks arrive by any means possible, foot, bike, or car and the church sends a representative to perform the religious ceremony. After the service, there is music and a delicious feast.

 

It really doesn’t matter how you feel about religion, attending a church service in what is truly “God’s House” will definitely inspire your soul. At the time of the Almkirta I attended at Krainsbergeralm, a Canadian hiker had been missing in nearby mountains and I have to admit to being moved to tears to hear his name being offered up in prayer.

 

So take my advice. Never pass up a chance to attend a Almkirta or by any of it is many other names Kirwa, – Kirchweih, Kirchtag, Kirtag, Kirta, Kirmes, Kerb, Kirb, Kermes, Kemmes, Kier, Kirbe, Kerwe, Kärwe, Kirda, Kerms, Kermst, Kärms, Kilwi, Kilbi, Kärmst, Chilbi and many more.

 

 

https://www.komoot.com/tour/6292063

http://www.brauchtumsseiten.de/a-z/k/kirta/home.htmlhttps://www.thelocal.de/20180828/tributes-paid-after-body-of-canadian-hiker-missing-in-bavarian-alps-found

 

 

 

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).

 

 

 

The Lüftlmaler of Schliersee….Peter Wimmer

I have been chasing the tail of the elusive and ever busy Lüftlmaler, for over a year now. With so many historic homes and new buildings, his work load never seems to ease. Thankfully we were able to carve out a few hours to meet.

When you think of the typical picturesque Bavarian or Alpine village you can’t help but think of all the beautifully painted building facades that decorate houses. Having once been an art restorer in my former life myself as well as a decorative painter, I have an endless fascination and respect for this timeless art form.

Peter Wimmer, Schliersee’s most esteemed Lüftmaler is known far and wide for his skills. I had the greatest pleasure to have this short visit with him while he worked on a small project near his home in Schliersee. Bathed in sunlight, he was working high on a scaffolding when I first approached him. His warm and jovial energy is quite infectious and I immediately felt comfortable talking with him.

He explained that there had been some damage to the stucco of the side of this historic home so he was replicating the Florentine detail painting around the windows. This for him was a simple repair. I can only imagine the scale of many of his other structures in his work experiences. Oxblood and ochre were his color palate on the day. These tones brought be right back to my mind t a trip I took to Provence and the village of Roussillon. These ancient colors are of the earth and their influence reached all the way to this lakeside alpine village.

What is a Lüftlmaler you ask? Well, in Peter’s case, he is a Master of the handcrafted method of wall-painting that became popular in alpine villages in the 18 century. Its popularity grew in Italy and Southern Germany during the baroque period as a way of showing wealth. These opulent paintings featuring many times religious figures were painted using the fresco technique.

The Fresco technique is much like it sounds, you have to work on a “fresh” or wet plaster surface. In doing so the paint is absorbed and becomes permanently impregnated into the wall surface. I found an interesting bit of “his-story” that details how the term ‘Lüftlmalerei’ came to be. It states that “Franz Seraph Zwinck (1748-1792), probably the most well-known craftsman of his guild. The story goes that he lived in a house called ‘Zum Lüftl’ in Oberammergau (such house names can still be found there rather often) and because of his profession, was called ‘the Lüftlmaler’ (the ‘Lüftl’ painter). The name of the whole guild most probably developed from this name during the 19th century”.

 

 

I hope you will take the time to look up Peter Wimmer and learn more about his magnificent talent.

www.lueftlmaler.eu

Peter Wimmer
Seestraße 37
83727 Schliersee

Tel.: 08026/94844

E-Mail: mail@wandkunst-wimmer.de

 

 

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).