Beiträge

The Great Debate…To Pick Up or not to pick up…that is the question.

It’s a constant discussion amongst dog owners here in Schliersee, ”Why exactly do I have to pick up after my dog when all other animals are allowed to defecate wherever they wish?”. Are the reasons simply cosmetic or a real environmental concern? Do the dog droppings somehow affect our precious cheese production? Isn’t it just considered fertilizer like the cow and horse manure?

 

After asking many of our local farmers for the exact reason dog owners must be vigilant I decided to do a bit of research on my own. It’s very important for us dog owners to not only be respectful of our farming neighbors but for us all to live in harmony. Making sure we carry a couple biodegradable bags is a small price to pay for keeping everyone happy and healthy.

 

The parasite Neospora Caninum is the concern when dog owners carelessly forget to pick up after their dogs. This infection naturally leads to the development of neosporosis which is spread through dog droppings. Dogs can become infected with neospora through eating raw meat. And if cows come into contact with the parasite, it can cause them to abort. One farmer told me that if cows eat dog faeces it makes the milk and cheese taste foul.

 

So the long and short of the great pick up debate, yes, it is very important you remove and properly dispose of your dog’s waste in a biodegradable pick up bag. Sadly I have noticed a lot of folks are unwilling to walk to the next trash can or dog waste station. We wish Schliersee to remain a dog friendly vacation spot, so please be aware while walking your dog and clean up accordingly. Schliersee and the surrounding areas have made this job easier by installing more designated dog stations in and around the towns and lakes.

 

 

For more information on Neospora:

 

https://www.fginsight.com/news/news/neosporosis-in-cattle-farmer-issues-emotional-plea-to-dog-walkers-after-cull-scare-20648

 

 

 

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).

 

 

 

Eisheiligen and Spring’s Folkloric Lesson

A bitter spring snow storm is a great reminder of the importance of listening to certain local folklore. One of my first homes in Germany was a cozy garden apartment and I spent many a day puttering around the garden with the my landlord’s elderly father.  He taught me many wonderful folk stories and many I still follow to this day.

One evening while we raced about finding containers and blankets to tuck in and protect our new little plants from the dropping temperatures and icy precipitation I was reminded of one very important lesson I was taught those many years ago. Here in Germany there are weather saints called the “Eisheiligen”, who dictate when you should begin your spring planting.  They serve an important purpose because it is easy to get lured by beautiful early spring sunshine to start plotting and planting your garden. Especially after a long hard winter.

The Eisheiligen are so important here in Germany that they have their own calendar which tells you when it is safest to plant each year. Not only do they have a calendar but they have names and their particular date which are as follows for 2017:

Termine 2017

  • Mamertus – Thursday, 11. Mai 2017
  • Pankratius – Friday, 12. Mai 2017
  • Servatius – Saturday, 13. Mai 2017
  • Bonifatius – Sunday, 14. Mai 2017
  • Kalte Sophie – Monday, 15. Mai 2017

For European farmers and gardeners 20-25 May seems to be the magical date deemed safe enough for animals to come out of the barns as well as seedlings to be planted. I have always wondered about this because many times people believe the first day of May to be the beginning of frost free time. But if you get the chance, you often see safe inside neighbors garages abundantly planted flower boxes waiting for the right date to be put out on display.

Creating those amazing flower boxes is an article for another day. Right now, as I sit here watching the snow fall I think I will put another log on the fire and go find my warm winter clothing I obviously put away too soon.

 

 

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).