Beiträge

Hunting Warm Holiday Cheer

Some people spend their lives tracking the Yeti, but I am on the trail of the most delicious and creative Glühwein stands Schliersee has to offer. This year I am excited to announce some new wonderful places to warm your hands and ignite your Christmas spirit.

On first Advent, I made our plans to visit Schliersee’s Seeweihnacht market at Sunset. We hoped to capture all that Christmas magic gathered before the majestic backdrop of alpine glow on the Brecherspitz. Once the chill hit our bones we decided a wander up to the Ratskeller for a delicious meal. First Advent is all about light and the Ratskeller did not disappoint. Matthias Gercken has pulled out all the stops with his incredible holiday decorating. The Ratskeller Glühwein stand which is nestled along side the Rathaus in Schliersee, was handmade in Austria and so, has encapsulated Tyrollean charm. While we ate,   we were serenaded by a local traditional Bavarian band creating a romantic atmosphere. Such a wonderfully typical German start to Christmas. Let’s not forget the delicious fireside mug of spiced fragrant Glühwein. It is holiday perfection inside and out.

Another warming thirsty stop is Lehmanns Neuhauser Stuben. It is located right in the middle of Neuhaus on the bend. Beneath a giant illuminated Christmas tree is their magical little Glühwein hut. All decked out in twinkle lights, with jazzy Christmas tunes playing it is the perfect spot to break your wander and warm up from nose to toes. Either heading up the slopes or while returning home, a stop at Lehmanns is a must do. Chris Lehmann has really gone all out to make his special corner of Neuhaus festive.

 

And lastly but definitely not least is the remarkable Glühwein stand on Obere Firstalm. While doing some moonlit sledding last full moon a friend and I discovered this wonderful gingerbread stand straight out of a Grimm fairytale. I had to find out the secret of when this Christmas mirage appears as I had never before seen it. Marcus Votteler of Obere Firstalm explained to me just how you can make this magic a part of your Christmas cheer. You can reserved this picturesque Glühwein stand for birthdays or office Christmas parties. Just contact them directly for more information. I don’t know about you but I can’t imagine a more perfect way to enjoy a December birthday than to be together with great friends under the stars, as all snuggle close around an open fire.

Now go forth and gather your friends and lets kick off this holiday season in the Bavarian way, fireside, Glühwein in hand.

For more information on how you can visit these huts for yourself.

Ratskeller Schliersee:
https://www.facebook.com/ratskeller.schliersee/?ref=br_rs

Lehmanns Neuhauser Stuben:
http://neuhauser-stuben.de

Obere Firstalm:
http://www.firstalm.de

 

 

 

 

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).

 

 

 

Christmas tree

American Christmas traditions are as varied in culture as the American people but in my and my Husband’s families there is a tradition of the memory Christmas tree.

When you grow up and move out of your parents house or get married and form your own family you are given a box of Christmas ornaments from your family tree that represent your childhood memories. This is so you can begin to build your own Christmas ornament collection and start your new holiday traditions.

Christmas tree

For many of my European friends where the tradition to decorate a small tree simply and leave it up for only a few days each year; our American tradition of a massive tree, with every nook and cranny filled with decorations, can be quite a shock. My own mother would take a week to decorate her tree and its beauty could be enjoyed for a month or more.

My favorite holiday memories were to help my grandmother decorate her tree all in clear crystal glass ornaments. We would put on some of her old vinyl records of 1950’s show tunes, sip hot cocoa and tenderly unwrap each beautiful memory and my Grandmother would share each beautiful family story.

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).

Most Wonderful Time of the Year

Truly the “Most Wonderful Time of the Year” happens at the end of November so if your lucky your guests arrive to a Winter wonderful land in Schliersee just at the moment the first Christmas markets or Christkindlmarkt begin to sparkle. In Schliersee the market moves to three separate yet beautiful locations, each with a theme.

3. The See Weihnachtsmarkt. We were able to see the See Weihnachtsmarket which was located in the Kurparc right on the lake in Schliersee. To the festive alpine music, lit by all the twinkle lights and warm glowing fires it was a lovely wander from booth to booth to discover all the wonderful handmade crafts. Being a lover of ornaments and each year we add a few special ones, I found an artist making beautifully delicate lace caps on round glass Christmas ornaments. So unique. That is something truly special I love about the Bavarian Christmas markets, all the different talented crafters bring their items to sell and its the perfect location to get all your unique Christmas gifts. You wont find these locally handmade products online or in any “Black Friday sale”.

For your future reference 2. Advent is the Wuide or Wild Christmas market inside Vitawelt. The 3. Advent is the Historic Market at the Wasmeier Museum, that is one not to be missed and the 4th and final market is a Romanic one out in front of the Terofal hotel and restaurant in Schliersee. Its these smaller town markets that truly exude the Christmas spirit. I hope you will get out and join in the fun.

http://schlierseer-weihnachtszauber.de

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).

Pumpkin Pie

In the United States we celebrate Christmas on 25 December but On 24 December, we open our homes to our neighbors and close friends to share (enjoy) warm Christmas drinks like mulled wine, the British version of Glühwein and hot chocolate and a cornucopia of amazing desserts. Many my Mom would make but also many were brought by our culturally diverse neighbors. We would have cookies from Italian neighbors, typical Japanese treats from another and then Christmas cookies like gingerbread men, were made and decorated by the children.

In my family home, pumpkin pie was always available from the very first signs of Autumn. My Mother would bake them for our Thanksgiving meal as well as Christmas because it was so beloved by all.

I have found that you can substitute butternut squash and other locally available pumpkins for this recipe and all other ingredients are also easy to find in German shops as well as online.

http://www.marthastewart.com/317045/classic-pumpkin-pie

INGREDIENTS
1 pumpkin, (about 4 pounds), halved,
1 1/2 recipes Pate Brisee
All-purpose flour, for work surface
7 large eggs
1 tablespoon heavy cream
1 1/2 cups plus 2 tablespoons packed light-brown sugar
2 tablespoon cornstarch
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
3 cups evaporated milk
Whipped cream, for serving
Directions
DIRECTIONS
1 Preheat oven to 425 degrees. If using fresh pumpkin, roast pumpkin, cut sides down, on a rimmed baking sheet until soft, 50 to 60 minutes. Let cool completely. Roasted pumpkin can be refrigerated in an airtight container overnight.
2 Reserve 1/4 of the dough for making leaf decorations. Turn out the remaining dough onto a lightly floured work surface; divide in half. Roll out each half into a 14-inch round. Fit rounds into two 10-inch pie plates; crimp edges as desired. Freeze until firm, about 15 minutes.
3 Roll out reserved dough to 1/8 inch thick. Transfer to a baking sheet, and freeze until firm, about 15 minutes. Using a leaf-shape cookie cutter or a paring knife, cut leaves from dough. Freeze until cold, about 10 minutes.
4 Reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Whisk 1 egg and heavy cream in a small bowl; set aside. Brush edges of pie shells with a wet pastry brush; arrange leaves around edges, pressing to adhere. Brush leaves with egg wash. Cut 2 large circles of parchment; fit into pie shells, extending above edges. Fill with pie weights. Freeze until cold, about 10 minutes.
5 Bake pie shells 10 minutes. Remove weights and parchment; bake 5 minutes more. Let cool completely on a wire rack.
6 If using fresh pumpkin, discard seeds. Scoop out flesh using a large spoon; transfer to a food processor. Process until smooth, about 1 minute. Transfer pumpkin to a large bowl. Add brown sugar, cornstarch, salt, cinnamon, ginger, vanilla, nutmeg, remaining 6 eggs, and evaporated milk; whisk until combined.
7 Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees. Place pies on a rimmed baking sheet. Divide pumpkin mixture evenly between shells. Bake until all but centers are set, 35 to 40 minutes. Let pies cool completely on a wire rack. Cut into wedges, and serve with whipped cream.

Laura Boston-Thek Laura Boston-Thek

American artist, photographer and professional wanderer who, after 20 years of roaming, put down roots in a 100 year old Bavarian farmhouse and fell in love with the Alpine village and its residents (both 2-legged and 4-legged).